October, 2016
Contents
Spiritual Offerings this fall ECW
New Members class The Shop
Communion Class SICM
From the Rector Book Club
Education for Children & Youth Blessing of the Animals
Adult Education Change in Coffee Hour
Home Communion Calendar for October
St. Stephen's Church

Spirituality Offerings This Fall

“The Many Faces of Prayer”
Saturday, October 15, 10:30 am – 12 noon
Saturday, November 12, 10:30 am – 12 noon

What is prayer?  Here are some thoughts! “In prayer we say who in fact we are – Dennienot who we think we should be, nor who we wish to be, but who we are” (Primary Speech, Barry and Ann Ulanov). “Prayer shapes us and transforms us. It centers us in God, and at the same time, in ourselves. It is always changing, as we are always becoming new in God” (To Love as God Loves, Roberta Blondi).   “The masters of prayer say that ‘prayer methods’ are like a drawbridge for entering a castle” (Praying Body and Soul, Anthony deMello). “Our life of prayer is a life of practice, touching every aspect of our lives and taking us through the heights, the depths and occasional swamps” (The Practice of Prayer, Margaret Guenther). Come! Be part of this exploration on prayer and the many faces!  All are welcome!  

Contact me with questions about these programs either at church or by email or phone. (denniebennett07@gmail.com, 315-945-9929)

“Listening for God: A Contemplative Practice”
Saturday, October 29, 10:30 am – 12 Noon

Spiritual discernment is described as prayerfully seeking God’s will, striving to distinguish the voice of God among the many other voices that influence us.  Discernment entails living into God’s timetable, not our own; biding us to let go of preconceived ideas and be open and alert to the presence and guidance of the Holy Spirit; beckoning us to be still and listen with the ear of the heart. “Discernment can be like driving an automobile at night: the headlights cast only enough light for us to see the next small bit of road immediately in front of us.” (Listening Hearts, Suzanne Farnham)

This gathering is a continuation of our conversation that began last spring.  If you are interested and did not attend the previous meeting, all that is necessary is to read the first five short chapters from the book Listening Hearts by Suzanne Farnham. There are a few copies available at church. All are welcome! 

Contact me with questions about these programs either at church or by email or phone. denniebennett07@gmail.com or 315-945-9929

Dennie+

A Prayer Resource: A Night Prayer (A New Zealand Prayer Book)

Lord, it is night. The night is for stillness. Let us be still in the presence of God.  It is night after a long day.  What has been done has been done; what has not been done has not been done; let it be.  

The night is dark.  Let our fears of the darkness of the world and of our own lives rest in you.

The night is quiet. Let the quietness of your presence enfold us, all dear to us, and all who have no peace. The night heralds the dawn. Let us look expectantly to a new day, new joys, new possibilities,

In your name we pray.  Amen.

New Members Class

Inquirers’ classes are a basic four week course which is held in an informal atmosphere and taught by the rector.  For those who are new to the Episcopal Church, or looking for a new spiritual home, this course will provide an introduction to the Church -- its history, beliefs, worship, and work in the world.            

Or, if you were confirmed earlier in life, and wish to renew your commitment at an adult level, consider this course as a part of your continuing Christian education.  The course is required for all who wish to be confirmed or received into the church.            

These classes will be held on Sunday afternoons at noon in the rector’s office beginning October 9th.

Communion Class

The prayerbook stresses that baptism is the beginning of full membership in the Church.  Since all baptized Christians are welcome at the altar, discretion is left to parents as to when they want their child to begin receiving communion.  Criteria for Confirmation involve the moment when a person is both old enough and prepared enough to know the implications of making a voluntary, public and personal acceptance of the vows made earlier at Baptism on his/her behalf.

Classes for parents and children who are planning to prepare for reception to the Holy Communion, and those who have already begun receiving but who want further preparation, will meet on two Wednesdays: October 19 in the parish hall from 4:45 pm to 6:15 pm and October 26 in the church from 4:45 pm to 5:30 pm.   Parents are needed to help on October 19th.
Those parents wishing their children to take communion for the first time could plan to do so on All Saints Sunday, Nov. 6th at the 10:15 am Eucharist. 

If you and your child would like to participate on Oct. 19 it is essential to contact the rector at  james.ross.mcd@gmail.com by Oct. 9th so that enough materials can be prepared. 

From the RectorJames

Dear Friends, 

As you know, prayer is the center of our congregation, however some clarification is necessary to understand for whom we pray and when we pray for them. 

There are three avenues to our prayer.  The most obvious are the intercessions on Sunday morning.  At that time, we pray for those who are or have been members of our congregation: those who are ill or recovering from surgery; those who celebrate birthdays, or baptismal and wedding anniversaries; and those who have died.  We get most of this information from our data bank, so it is very important that your anniversary dates are accurate.  If we pray for you on the wrong date, please update your family information so that we can correct this.  Forms are available on the table in the back of the church (the purple sheets).

A second avenue is the prayer sheet in the binder on the prayer desk in the back of the church.  While it is too long to include all those names in our Sunday morning prayers, Deacon Pat and I (and anyone else who comes) pray those prayer requests every morning at Morning Prayer.  So if you have someone for whom you want the church’s prayers, kept writing their first name on that prayer list each week.  If possible, it is also nice to let that person know that we are praying for him/her.  It makes a big difference to many people.

Finally, there is a group in our congregation who has formed a ‘prayer chain’.  When you or someone you care for needs prayer, please call the parish office with the name of the person, and the reason for your request.  From that point a large chain of people will be notified and that person will be included in their individual prayers.  This is a powerful resource and I commend all those involved with this group.  I especially want to thank Suzanne Taylor for keeping this prayer list up to date.  If you wish to become part of this prayer chain, please call the parish office.

I have experienced the power of prayer in my own life and in the life of others.  Please keep our congregation and our community in your prayers.

Shalom
James+

Education for Children and YouthMiranda

September 18, designated National Back to Church Day in some denominations, was the first day of classes for our younger students with Lisa Zebrowski our nursery manager welcoming the youngest ones to the nursery and the Holy Spirit Kids class working with Ms. Miranda.

It was good to welcome everyone back and to enjoy the pot luck luncheon and Parish Faire that morning and to see how much everyone had grown during the summer!

On September 25 the Sunday Friends students gathered for the first time. Two siblings moved up from the Holy Spirit Kids class. We have eight students in this class. Scripts for Christmas skits were reviewed and one was chosen. It will be presented on December 18, the 4th Sunday in Advent during the 10:15 service. Also discussed were service projects. We decided to do a peanut-butter and jelly sandwich bag lunch project for the City Mission early in November and to check the schedule at the Regional Food Bank for opportunities to work there on a Saturday afternoon three or four times during the school year. The way volunteer labor is organized there was very satisfying to the students when we went in April and they look forward to visiting again.

Nursery and Holy Spirit Kids follow the same curriculum at their respective grade level which follows the lectionary cycle – in general what the children hear read from the lectern on Sunday mornings is the same text as their curriculum.  Most Sundays the gospel lesson is the designated script, but occasionally the curriculum chooses the Old Testament lesson instead.

Sunday Friends will concentrate on learning their script for the Christmas program and on the aforementioned service projects. Occasionally we may play board games such as Apples to Apples Bible Edition. A 4-session Advent study will help prepare us for Christmas.

I hold “office hours” at church on Sunday mornings for 30 minutes prior to the 10:15 service. I can be reached by leaving a message on my home phone or via email at any time. I am always happy to answer questions or try to solve a problem.

The most rewarding and enjoyable aspect of my work is watching the energy and curiosity of the younger children and to see the older kids mature into amazing teens and tweens. I am blessed by your children! Thank you!

Miranda Rand
Education Director
393-5047 (home phone)
Mirandarand411@gmail.com

Adult Education

Wednesday Evening Bible Study:

DISCOVERING THE BIBLE:
An Introduction to the Old and New Testaments

Many people would like to become more familiar with the Bible’s characters, stories and message. That’s a worthy ambition, but where do you begin? Many would-be readers are paralyzed by the sheer size of the Bible and by not knowing where to start.  The Bible is a big book with stories, advice, promises, good news, how-tos, letters, poems—all teaching us how to live now and forever. This course is one way to begin.  We will start with the very basics of navigating around the bible, and then add new skills with plenty of time to use them.

October 5 - Getting Acquainted
October 12 - The Old Testament
October 19- The New Testament
October 26 - Survival, Spread, and Influence

Classes are held on Wednesday evenings from 7:30 to 9:00 in the Conference room.  Please contact the rector at james.ross.mcd@gmail.com.

Sunday Morning Forum:

Public Policy and Our Christian Faith

There is a strong emphasis in our Anglican tradition in which each believer is called to improve the future by searching for solutions to today’s problems.  This series of forums will present valuable information on today’s national issues.  The discussions will attempt to allow participants to form their own conclusions (very Anglican!)

Oct. 2  Politics:  How Do We Want to Govern America?
Oct. 9  Affirmative Action:  How Can We Be Fair?
Oct. 16    The Economy:  The $16 trillion debt: tough choices about soaring federal deficits.
Oct. 23    Public Schools:  How do we get the results we want?
Oct. 30  Foreign policy:  Should we reassess America's global role?

Sunday Mornings, 9am – 10am,
Conference Room

More information about Adulrt Education at http://www.saintstephenschenectady.org/Education/Adult_education.html

Home Communion

If you or someone you know is unable to attend church on either a long or short-term basis, please call the parish office if you would like to have communion brought to you.

Episcopal Church Women – ECW

Our vision for all women of the Episcopal Church is that we become a vibrant blend of all ages, coming together as a peacemaking, healing part of the Church. We aspire to be a God spark – shining and sharing the love of Christ.   Vision Statement of the National ECW

Beginning with a revealing icebreaker about the origins of our own names, several women of the parish gathered in the parish hall for a shared meal on September 24.

We used a survey from the website of the National ECW to determine our interests and ideas for a group of St. Stephen’s women, as well as each one’s level of commitment, in order to come up with plans for 2016-17.  We look to include all women in the parish to be part of a dynamic sisterhood to reach out in Christ’s love to those around us.

Taking the top few items indicated in these areas on the survey, we arrived at the following:

SPIRITUAL GROWTH – Miranda Rand & Carole Merrill-Mazurek to coordinate

  • Small group Bible study that meets regularly.  Suggestions:  Kerygma, Handel’s Messiah; Resources – Pat Jones, Dennie Bennett, Richey Woodzell
  • Field trips - to short destinations to visit historic churches, churches of other faiths, to see Christian drama presentations, to hear speakers at other places.

OUTREACH – Erin Cohen & Vicki Hoshko to plan Christmas outreach

  • Do a single fundraiser that requires minimum planning and preparation and give the funds raised to an outreach concern. (example: dinner, bake sale, garage sale, etc.).  
  • Be a part of an ECW event that focuses on an outreach concern and in some way gives aid to that concern. (exampble: baby shower for a pre-natal clinic, toy shower for children's home, gathering clothes for the poor, etc.).
  • Be a part of a group of women who commit regularly scheduled time to help some cause in the community like a women's shelter, food pantry, etc.
  • Bring in cans of soup for SICM pantry on Super Bowl Sunday.

WITHIN PARISH

  • Have a one-time event fundraiser to purchase or contribute to something necessary for this congregation or building.  Suggestions:  knives & holder for kitchen, furnishings for small areas for conversations/meetings, improvement of acoustics in parish hall, reserving a portion of tag sale proceeds for parish use.
  • Have speakers come in to do demonstrations such as cooking, flower arranging, etc. – Liz Varno to coordinate.
  • Go out of town together with no serious agenda. (example: to a B&B, go antique shopping, see the wildflowers, go to a museum, go to a play) – maybe during the summer; Claudia Turner volunteered to organize a bus trip

FUTURE MEETINGS - Carole Merrill-Mazurek & Richey Woodzell to come up with a schedule

  • Bi-monthly
  • Vary times:  after church on Sunday, between the services, weekday evenings (avoid Tuesday and Thursday)

If you are interested in being a part of the ECW, speak with Carol Merrill-Mazurek, Erin Cohen, Tracy Ormsbee, Liz Varno or Richey Woodzell.  Please join us!

The Shop

The shop needs a new manager. Please think about taking over this important and fun part of life at St. Stephen’s. Any funds we make are used for scholarships and activities for our youth groups.  I will be retiring on Nov. 1, 2016. Many thanks, especially to my faithful helpers, Louise, June and Claudia, and to all of you for your support of the shop.

Blessings to all, Marilyn

SICM NewsHarvest SICM

The Food Pantry continues to need both food and money –  donated dollars will enable the pantry team to buy cases of essential foods from the Regional Food bank.  If your garden is still producing tomatoes, zucchini and other vegetables by the bushel please consider taking some of your bounty to the SICM Pantry on Albany Street.  Many of the people who come to the pantry would be delighted to get fresh vegetables!

The October SICM Assembly will be Tuesday October 4 at 7pm at Mt Olivet Baptist Church 1055 Wendell Ave.  Refreshments will be at 6:45 and the meeting will begin at 7.  People from FOCUS churches will lead a workshop on advocacy in congregations. If you are interested or just curious about what happens at these assemblies please join us.

Theresa and Marti

Further SICM information at http://www.sicm.us/

The easiest book club you’ll ever join

Five reasons you haven’t come to book club before and a solution for each:

1.     I’m too busy to read a recipe, let alone a whole book. You don’t have to read them all. Just pick one or two from the list and come to those meetings. Or read as far as you can and we’ll fill you in on the rest!
2.     I’m in another book club already. Bonus! Check our list for books on your other club’s list and read it once, talk about it twice!
3.     I don’t drive at night any more. Tracy Ormsbee does, though, and she’ll pick you up and take you home.542-3385 / tormsbee1@gmail.com
4.     I don’t like non-fiction/historical fiction/mystery/name other disliked genre here. Only come for the books you like.
5.     I don’t have a baby sitter. We’ll work with you. Let us know when you want to come and we’ll see if we can find a college-age person who’s come back home to finish at UAlbany who can watch kids in the nursery.

If you’ve never attended the St. Stephen’s Book Club before, this is your year. The book list is excellent. The conversation is lively and there’s no pressure to come every time. In fact, in the company of this warm church family, even finishing the book is optional.

Listed below are all the books we’ll read this year and the dates we’ll discuss each. Pick just the one you really want to read and come to that one discussion. The book club meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7:00 PM in the Youth Lounge.  If you need a ride, call Tracy Ormsbee, 542-3385 or email tormsbee1@gmail.com
The selections are:

Oct. 11:  White Dresses:  A Memoir of Love and Secrets, Mothers and Daughters by Mary Pflum Peterson  -- In this riveting, poignant memoir of three generations of women and the white dresses that adorned them—television producer Mary Pflum Peterson recounts a journey through loss and redemption, and her battle to rescue her mother, a former nun, from compulsive hoarding.

Nov. 15 (3rd Tuesday):  The Mathematician's Shiva by Stuart Rojstaczer -- When the greatest female mathematician in history passes away, her son, Alexander "Sasha" Karnokovitch, just wants to mourn his mother in peace.  But rumor has it the notoriously eccentric Polish émigré has solved one of the most difficult problems in all of mathematics, and has spitefully taken the solution to her grave.  As a ragtag group of mathematicians from around the world descends upon Rachela's shiva, determined to find the proof or solve it for themselves--even if it means prying up the floorboards for notes or desperately scrutinizing the mutterings of her African Grey parrot--Sasha must come to terms with his mother's outsized influence on his life.

Dec. 13: A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman -- Meet Ove. He’s a curmudgeon—the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him “the bitter neighbor from hell.” But must Ove be bitter just because he doesn’t walk around with a smile plastered to his face all the time? Behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness. So when one November morning a chatty young couple with two chatty young daughters move in next door and accidentally flatten Ove’s mailbox, it is the lead-in to a comical and heartwarming tale of unkempt cats, unexpected friendship, and the ancient art of backing up a U-Haul. All of which will change one cranky old man and a local residents’ association to their very foundations.

Jan. 10: My Brilliant Friend by Elena Forrente -- A modern masterpiece from one of Italy’s most acclaimed authors, My Brilliant Friend is a rich, intense, and generous-hearted story about two friends, Elena and Lila. Ferrante’s inimitable style lends itself perfectly to a meticulous portrait of these two women that is also the story of a nation and a touching meditation on the nature of friendship.

Feb. 14: The Nightengale by Kristin Hannah -- In the quiet village of Carriveau, Vianne Mauriac says goodbye to her husband, Antoine, as he heads for the Front. She doesn't believe that the Nazis will invade France … but invade they do, in droves of marching soldiers, in caravans of trucks and tanks, in planes that fill the skies and drop bombs upon the innocent. When a German captain requisitions Vianne's home, she and her daughter must live with the enemy or lose everything. Without food or money or hope, as danger escalates all around them, she is forced to make one impossible choice after another to keep her family alive.

March 14: All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr -- From the highly acclaimed, multiple award-winning Anthony Doerr, the beautiful, stunningly ambitious instant New York Times bestseller about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II.

April 11: The Notorious RBG by Irin Carmon and Shana Knizhnik -- Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg never asked for fame—she has only tried to make the world a little better and a little freer. But nearly a half-century into her career, something funny happened to the octogenarian: she won the internet. Across America, people who weren’t even born when Ginsburg first made her name as a feminist pioneer are tattooing themselves with her face, setting her famously searing dissents to music, and making viral videos in tribute.

May 9: Miller’s Crossing by Anna Quindlen -- A novel about family and the secrets that we keep―a young woman learning to love and leave home and realizing that, maybe, she never quite left. From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Still Life with Bread Crumbs and Rise and Shine.

June 13: The Badass Librarians of Timbuktu by Joshua Hammer -- To save precious centuries-old Arabic texts from Al Qaeda, a band of librarians in Timbuktu pulls off a brazen heist worthy of Ocean’s Eleven.

Blessing of the Animals and St. Francis of AssisiBlessings

On October 4th we celebrate the life and work of St. Francis. He is probably better known for preaching to birds than for the poverty he embraced in his passion to be like Christ. Yet, Francis’ love of God’s creation has given his statue a place in many church and home gardens.
No mere nature lover, Francis saw in nature’s paradoxes and mysteries a revelation of the presence of God. He marveled at the simplicity and obedience of the birds, fishes, rabbits, doves, the falcon who wakened him for Matins, the famous wolf of Gubbio who gave his pledge of peace to Francis and kept it.

Because of St. Francis’ connection to God’s creation,blessings and especially to animals, a tradition arose in England whereby the parish priest would bless the villagers’ animals on St. Francis’ Day, Oct. 4. So we will celebrate St. Francis Day on the closest Saturday, October 1st  at 10:00am.
Here’s how it will work:

On October 1st the congregation and any animals (on leashes!) will gather on the front lawn of the church. WE WILL REMAIN OUTSIDE DURING THE ENTIRE SERVICE. The rector will begin a brief worship service and then will bless each animal saying: “O God, who has made all things for yourself, bless, we pray you, this animal; that it may be a source of love and joy to those with whom it dwells.”

It’s quite a sight!

Quilts – QuiltingQuilt

Do you sew?
Are you interested in quilts?
Do you have a dream of making a quilt and don’t know how to start?
Have you started a quilt and put it aside for several years?

If you have answered “Yes” to anyof these questions,
contact Jean Versocki or Richey Woodzell.

Our quilt pattern starting in October is “Cathedral Windows.”

Saturday, October 22 at 10:00 AM.

Change in Coffee Hour

On a trial basis, on the first Sunday of each month, we will have just ONE coffee hour between the services.  This will begin on October 2nd.  On other Sundays we will have a coffee hour after the later service as well.

The two worshiping communities can overlap and get to know each other; perhaps continuing the larger congregation that we experience during the summer.  Those who don’t have time to chat after the later service can come early and converse then.  Also, it will simplify the jobs of the hosts.  The 8:00 hosts can make the coffee, the 10:15 hosts can clean up; both can contribute to the food/drink.  And anyone who wishes to donate food for coffee hour may sign up any Sunday to do that. 

Also on those first Sundays of the month, Fr. James will hold a “sermon feedback” session in the library after the later service.

Tentative Calendar for October, 2016

Latest information: Sunday morning announcements & Sunday bulletin.

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
     



 
1
9:00 Morning Prayer
9:00-2:00 TAG SALE
10:00 Blessing of the Animals

7:30 Candlelight Labyrinth Walk

2
7:30 Morning Prayer
8:00 Communion
9:00 Adult education
9:00 Coffee hour
9:45 Choir Practice
10:00 Nursery Care
10:15 Communion
10:30 Holy Spirit Kids
11:30 Sermon Feedback
11:30 Sunday Friends

3
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer

4
9:00 Morning Prayer 
10:30 Seminar



6:45 SICM Assembly
5
8:30 Osteo Exercise
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Communion & Healing


7:30 Bible Study
6
9:00 Morning Prayer




7:30 Choir
7
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer

1:00-6:00 Blood Drive
8
9:00 Morning Prayer
9
7:30 Morning Prayer
8:00 Communion
9:00 Adult education
9:45 Choir Practice
10:00 Nursery Care
10:15 Communion
10:30 Holy Spirit Kids
11:30 Coffee Hour
11:30 Sunday Friends
10
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer





7:30 Vestry
11
9:00 Morning Prayer 
10:30 Seminar




7:00 Book Club

12
8:30 Osteo Exercise
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Communion & Healing
12:00 DOK


7:30 Bible Study

13
9:00 Morning Prayer




7:30 Choir

14
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer

15
9:00 Morning Prayer

10:30 Many Faces of Prayer

16
7:30 Morning Prayer
8:00 Communion
9:00 Adult education
9:45 Choir Practice
10:00 Nursery Care
10:15 Communion
10:30 Holy Spirit Kids
11:30 Coffee Hour
11:30 Sunday Friends

17
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Parish Council
18
9:00 Morning Prayer 
10:30 Seminar

19
8:30 Osteo Exercise
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Communion & Healing

4:45 Communion Class


7:30 Bible Study

20
9:00 Morning Prayer



7:30 Choir
21
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer





6:00 Family Haloween Night
22
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Quilt Group
23
7:30 Morning Prayer
8:00 Communion
9:00 Adult education
9:45 Choir Practice
10:00 Nursery Care
10:15 Communion
10:30 Holy Spirit Kids
11:30 Coffee Hour
11:30 Sunday Friends
24
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
25
9:00 Morning Prayer 
10:30 Seminar

26
8:30 Osteo Exercise
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Communion & Healing

4:45 Communion Class

7:30 Bible Study

27
9:00 Morning Prayer



7:30 Choir
28
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer 
 29
9:00 Morning Prayer

10:30 Listening for God
30
7:30 Morning Prayer
8:00 Communion
9:00 Adult education
9:45 Choir Practice
10:00 Nursery Care
10:15 Communion
10:30 Holy Spirit Kids
11:30 Coffee Hour
11:30 Sunday Friends
31`
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
         

St. Stephen's Episcopal Church

Church Staff
The Rev. Dr. James R. McDonald, Rector, 
Rev. Dennie Bennett, Assisting Priest,
The Rev. Patricia L. Jones, Deacon, 
Miranda Rand, Christian Education Director, 
Susan Lohnas, Organist,
Douglas Lohnas, Choir Director, 
Lisa Zebrowski, Nursery Manager,
Laura Bynon and Chris Quinn, Nursery School 
Joe and Donna White, Custodians 

The Vestry
Sr. Warden, Brian Riordon
Jr. Warden, Jim Syta
Clerk: Tracy Ormsbee
Treasurer: Denise Crates

Vestry Class of 2016
Travis Reedy
Richey Woodzell
Joe Palko

Vestry Class of 2017
Joanne Frank
Peter Nelson
Elissa Prout

Vestry  Class of 2018
Linda Emaelaf
Liz Varno
Mary Alexander

The Church Office
Our office is located at 1229 Baker Avenue. 
The telephone number is (518) 346-6241.
If we are unable to answer your call, please leave a message.
We will call you back as soon as possible. 
The Rector's email is: james.ross.mcd@gmail.com
Our website is http://www.saintstephenschenectady.org/
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/SaintStephensSchenectady
The Messenger is published September - June. 
Please submit articles to editor Chris Jones by the 25th of the Month before.