January, 2016

The Epiphany of Our LordStar

The name "Epiphany" is derived from a Greek word meaning "manifestation" or "appearing." It is also called "The Manifestation of Christ to the Gentiles."  This phrase is a reference to the story of the Wise Men from the East.

A Christian observance on January 6 is found as early as the end of the second century in Egypt.  The feast combined commemorations of the visit of the Magi, led by the star of Bethlehem; the Baptism of Jesus in the waters of the River Jordan; and Jesus' first recorded miracle, the changing of water into wine at the marriage of Cana of Galilee - - all thought of as manifestations of the incarnate Lord.

The Epiphany is still the primary Feast of the Incarnation in Eastern Churches, and the threefold emphasis is still prominent.  In the West, however, including the Episcopal Church, the story of the Wise Men has tended to overshadow the other two events.  Modern lectionary reform, reflected in the Book of Common Prayer, has recovered the primitive trilogy, by setting the event of the Baptism as the theme of the First Sunday after January 6th.

Our celebration of Epiphany at St. Stephen's will take place on Sunday, January 10th at 8:00 am and 10:15 a.m. with Eucharist and renewal of our Baptismal vows.

Table of Contents
Click on items of just scroll down and read

Epiphany Household Blessing Thank You!!! Star of Bethlehem
Fr. James Home Communion When to call Clergy Epiphany Pot Luck
Deacon Pat Family Diner Night January Calendar Education
Annual Meeting Clothing Swap St. Stephen's Church Adult Education

From the Rector

Dear Friends,

This Christmas season finds us in so many different places and conditions. Many I have talked with in passing conversation mention their worry over job security as the Christmas bills begin to arrive. Others are still on their holiday trip visiting family and friends. Some struggle with how to make enBlessingds meet on a fixed income, while others are beginning college savings plans with the birth of a new child. This season also finds more and more of our church members involved in ministries who try to help people for whom Christmas is bleak.

One of my favorite Christmas carols is "In the Bleak Midwinter" and every year I ponder the question asked: "What can I give him, poor as I am...If I were a shepherd, I would bring a lamb; if I were a Wise Man, I would do my part..."

As I look back over the year 2015 I am proud of what our relatively small parish has done for Schenectady and for our own congregation. We are very involved in the many outreach programs of Schenectady Inner City Ministry and our members are involved in most every community agency I know: from tutoring young students to serving meals to the homeless. Our youth groups increasingly have been involved in service projects and have great plans for 2016!

In addition, the folks who are attending to the needs of our own church have done their part. Thanks to generous financial giving (most all pledges were increased this year!), we are one of the few churches I know who are able to close our books in the black as well as to do such things as fixing roofs and keeping up on general maintenance.

Yes, St. Stephen's struggles with what it means to "do our part" and as community needs and congregational needs increase I suspect so will our struggle. We all stand together in the bleak midwinter, trusting that by grace, we may at best give Him our heart.

James+

. . . . . from the Deacon’s BenchPat

January, 2016

As I look back over the month of December, it seems impossible that we were able to extend our collective embrace to include so many of God’s children. In the jail, Mariellen, my colleague from Trinity Presbyterian Church, and I handed out over 1000 Christmas cards, so that the inmates could send them out to their loved ones. The cards were received with great appreciation, especially since they were already stamped. (For inmates, postage must be ordered through the commissary, and even $1.47 for 3 stamps is often beyond their means.)

The proposal to fund a cow through the Heifer Project was so successful that, in addition to a cow, we also purchased a goat, with some money left over.

Your response to the request for Holiday Friends, to help a parish family over a rough patch, was very generous, and Father James and I were able to deliver the gift in time for Christmas.

And all those beautiful books for children that were under the Giving Tree! I wanted to stop and read each one. Unfortunately, we were unable to give them to the children of jail inmates as we had hoped. The planning and preparation involved many steps and needed more time than we had, but we are hopeful that it may be possible at a later time. Instead, we delivered around 50 books to 3 sites run by the YWCA: the Day Care at the Y, the Children’s Center at SCCC, and the Domestic Violence Shelter--and to the SICM Food Pantry, where Carole Merrill-Mazurek will distribute them.

In a time when disrespect and hostility, fear and anger are in the news every day, it is important to light a candle rather than merely curse the darkness. We are blessed to be able to give, by the grace of God, with such generosity.

Deacon Pat

Annual Meeting Called for January 24th

Each year on the fourth Sunday in January, our congregation holds its Annual Meeting.  The purposes of the meeting are to elect representatives to the vestry, to review finances of the parish for the past year and to examine the budget of the current year, to hear brief reports from parish leaders and the clergy, and to discuss other issues which affect the congregation.

What Is The Vestry'?

The vestry is a group of eleven lay representatives from the parish who are charged with the temporal affairs of the congregation. They meet monthly with the rector presiding. The vestry spends considerable time on income and expenses and on writing the annual budget. They set the salary scales and are responsible for raising the money to meet expenses. The vestry also has the important job of finding a new rector whenever a vacancy occurs. Three representatives are elected at the annual parish meeting for a term of three years. In addition, a Warden (vestry officer) is elected for a term of two years.

Nominating Committee Appointed

In an attempt to be as inclusive as possible in nominating parishioners for elective offices, the vestry has appointed the outgoing members of the vestry as a nominating committee. They are securing the nominations for the six positions vacant for next year. In addition, nominations will continue to be made from the floor of the Annual Meeting of the parish. The elected offices are:

3 - three year terms for Class of 2018 Vestry
2 - one year terms for Class of 2016 Vestry
1 - Warden - two year term

Requirements For Vestry Membership

Basically there are only three requirements for vestry membership:

(1) be a confirmed member of the parish church. This can be accomplished through confirmation or reception by a bishop or through a transfer from another Episcopal Church,

(2) have been regular in attendance of Sunday Eucharists,

(3) have been faithful in working, praying, and giving for the spread of the Kingdom of God.
This includes giving of time, talent and treasure

Star of Bethlehem

"Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea in the days of Herod the King, behold there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem, saying, "Where is he that is born King of the Jews? For we have seen his star in the east, and have come to worship him." Matthew 2:1 2

The star seen by the Wise Men, as described in the Gospel of Matthew, has been a perennial source of wonder for astronomers and lay people alike for over 2000 years. It has engaged the interest of historians and chronologists striving to determine the exact year of Christ's birth, theologians and exegetes attempting to plumb its significance, orientalists seeking to place the story in the context of the astrological beliefs of the time, and astronomers hoping to explain the phenomenon in a natural way.

Experts have placed the birth of Christ between 8 and 5 BC. If the Star of Bethlehem was the result of a natural event, there are several possibilities regarding the type of phenomenon that it could have been. Was it a brilliant meteor, a comet, an exploding star(nova) or a remarkable grouping of the planets? CoVanGoghuld it have been a supernatural sign in the skies above, or something else entirely?

Astronomer David Hughes, in his book, The Star of Bethlehem: An Astronomer's Confirmation, indicates that as far as comets are concerned, a list was made in 1871 by John Williams, who derived his information from Chinese sources. This list contained 372 comets occurring between 611 BC and 1640 AD, which means that an easily visible comet was recorded every five to six years. Number 51 in Williams' list was Halley's Comet of August 26, 12 BC, which was too early to be the star of Bethlehem, while number 54 occurred in December, 13 AD, and was too late. We are therefore left with the intervening two, both of which fall in the reign of the Emperor Ai Ti of the Han Dynasty, who ruled from 6 BC to 1 BC. The first is number 52 in Williams' list and was recorded by Ma Tuan Lin: "In the reign of the Emperor Ai Ti, the second year of the epoch chie n p'ing, the second month a comet appeared in Ch'ien nui for about seventy days." Pan Ku writing in the Chien Had She said that it appeared "for more than seventy days." The epoch Chien ping is the equivalent of 6 to 3 BC, so that the second month of the second year is March 5 BC. Chien nib is a star division equivalent to our present constellation of Capricorn. The object seen was termed a huihsing, which can be translated as a 'sweeping star' or a 'broom star.'

If not a comet, then, could it have been an exploding star such as a nova or supernova? At the height of its outburst, a nova may shine with a brilliance 50,000 times greater than normal. The main objection to the nova theory is that novae are short liveHubbled, single events, which do not brighten, dim, and brighten again, as the Christmas Star appeared to do. Another possibility is that the Christmas Star may have been a meteor. That is, a shooting or falling star as meteors are commonly called. However, it is more than the average meteor which is under consideration as a possible Christmas Star. A meteoroid the size of a walnut could blaze across the heavens with a brilliance rivaling the moon. Such an object is known as a bolide, and if it should explode in flight as sometimes happens because of rapid, unequal heating of objects that were deathly cold in space it is designated as a fireball. It is highly unlikely, though, that this type of phenomenon could be the origin of the Star of Bethlehem. Two thousand years ago, unlike today, it was a popular pastime to gather outdoors beneath the stars and retell the popular legends as to how the various constellations came to be in the sky. It is hardly probable that people who watched the heavens so much would consider a bolide rare enough to herald so great an event as the birth of a King of the Jews. Moreover, since a meteor is a very short event (a few seconds at most), the Star of Bethlehem, which was seen over a long period, could not possibly have been a meteor.

Another possibility of the Star of Bethlehem's origin is an apparent close passage between two planets or an apparent grouping of several planets as seen from the Earth. When two celestial objects appear in the same direction as seen from Earth astronomers call it a conjunction. The triple conjunction of 7 BC between Jupiter and Saturn is believed by many to be the Star of Bethlehem witnessed by the Wise Men. Here is how it occurred: On May 29th of that year Jupiter passed Saturn which resulted in the two planets standing fairly close together. Our planet Earth, which is much closer to the Sun than Jupiter, takes only 1 year to orbit the Sun as opposed to the 12 years that it takes Jupiter. As a consequence, the Earth passes Jupiter annually as the two planets speed around their circular tracks in space. 

When this happens, Jupiter seems, for a brief time, to reverse its course in the heavens and move backward or to the west. As a result it passed Saturn again on September 29th, so the two planets again stood in conjunction in the constellation we call Pisces. The movements of the Earth and Jupiter canceled out the apparent backward motion and Jupiter reversed its course, going east once again. This time, it passed Saturn on December 4th, and for the third time in a year, the planets stood together in Pisces. By late autumn, they were high in the western sky, which was what the Wise Men may have witnessed. 

Was the Christmas Star a planetary alignment? Or a brilliant bolide, or a nova, or a comet? The theories of a planetary conjunction or a comet have strong supporters. Some theories see the Star of Bethlehem as a combination of several astronomical events. Who knows? We may never really be sure. Whatever the Christmas Star may have been, enjoy the holiday season with family and friends. 

Epiphany Pot LuckKing

January 10, following 10:15 Eucharist

Celebrate Epiphany in style. Bring a dish to share, enjoy visiting your friends, get ready to sing We Three Kings of Orient Are, and very possibly welcome a visit from the Magi.

Household Blessing for Epiphany

A custom from Eastern Europe that is presently being recovered in North America is the practice of blessing homes on Epiphany.  Members of the household go from room to room expressing thanks to God for each room and asking God to bless the room and its intended use.  Some small symbol of the blessing may be carried to leave in each room: a candle, a cross, "gifts" of the Magi.

The procession ends outside the front door where the door's lintel is marked in chalk with the year and the initials C.M.B - each separated by a cross -  recalling the traditional names of the Magi: Casper, Melchior and Balthasar.  The members of the household are then invited to add their own initials.  Also at this time it is appropriate to pledge volunteer time or other gifts for Bethesda House or some local homeless shelter as signs of our thankfulness to God.  The ritual ends with a celebration of the Eucharist.

Talk to the rector if you would like to have your home blessed.

Home Communion

If you or someone you know is unable to attend church on either a long or short term basis, please call the parish office if you would like to have communion brought to you.

Family Dinner Night

About 20 people met on December 12 to bake cookies, do crafts and share supper. It was fun for everyone. The next Family Dinner Night is scheduled for January 21. Activities start at 5 and a dinner will be served around 6 PM. Come for the entire time, come just for dinner (why not, were doing the cooking!), or pop in just for coffee before choir rehearsal. We'd love to see you.

Please RSVP to Erin Cohen by Jan. 19th.

St. Stephen's Clothing Swap

St. Stephen's is holding its first clothing swap on Saturday, January 16th from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm.  Light refreshments will be served.  Many of you may be asking yourselves, “What is a clothing swap?”  Well, a clothing swap is a great way to recycle and reuse clothing and to save money.  However, there are some “rules” that help make a swap successful.

  1. Each person who is participating should be bring in a minimum 3 items of clothing, accessories, jewelry, shoes etc. and a maximum of 10.  Please do not clean out your closet and bring all clothing items that you don't want.  
  2. And, each person only takes home the number of items that they have brought to the swap.  For example, if you brought 4 items, you leave with 4 items.  This ensures that everyone leaves with something.
  3. We will need a variety of sizes.
  4. All clothes should be current, in good condition and washed.
  5. All leftover items will be donated to Bethesda House.

So please start thinking of items that you want to swap.  I will start the collection process in the beginning of January.  Any questions, email me.

Claudia.

Education January 2016

Happy New Year!

Christmas Pageants. First a big thank you to all the parents. MomsMiranda and dads enthusiastically supported and coached their children, helped with costuming, attended rehearsals, narrated scripts, and provided extra supplies and props. All very much appreciated.

The Sunday Friends (Grades 5-6-7) skit was well delivered and expertly acted by Juliette Syta, Ganon and Brody Riordon and Vera Crates. I have no doubt whatsoever that in due time their names will be on the marquee at Proctors. Good job!

Children of the Holy Spirit (Grades K-4) embraced the merging of the creation story with the traditional nativity scene with gusto. Presenting first as card carriers as the creation story unfolded, and then as characters participating in the story of Jesus’ birth.

There are NO classes January 3.

When we resume, the Children of the Holy Spirit will move back across the hall to the old Godly Play classroom now equipped with tables and chairs sufficient for all to work without being squished. There is a big range of maturation levels in this class and the class size has grown from just 4 or 5 students to 12-14 on any given Sunday morning. Before classes start again I will be instituting a parent helper system. If everyone takes a turn, involvement will not require a Sunday more often than once every twelve or fifteen weeks.

Since September, nine new children have enrolled in our education program – two in the nursery and seven in the K-4 classroom. That is exciting and a great tribute to the congregation’s warm and welcoming presence.

During the Christmas break I will be calling local not-for-profits and community service organizations to talk about service project opportunities for our Sunday Friends class. When we resume I will review these opportunities with the students and establish a schedule.

Miranda Rand
Education Director

Adult Education

Inquirers' classes

Inquirers' classes are intended to give prospective members an overview of how Episcopalians fit into the complex of protestant and catholic churches.  Discussion topics include the world-wide Anglican Church, the National Episcopal Church, our own Diocese of Albany, our own parish of St. Stephen's and the relationship among all four.  Discussion are candid and open.

This course is required of all adults who wish to be confirmed or received into the church, but is open to all members of the Parish Family.  Confirmation will take place at the Cathedral of All Saints next fall.

All classes take place in the rector's study (next to the church) from January 31st through February 21st from
noon - 1pm.  If you are interested, please call the office at 346-6241.

Bible StudyBible

Wednesday Evening Bible Study
DISCOVERING THE BIBLE:  An Introduction to the Old and New Testaments

January 6 - Getting Acquainted
January 13 - The Old Testament
January 20 - The New Testament
January 27 - Survival, Spread, and Influence

Classes are held on Wednesday evenings from 7:30 to 9:00 in the Conference room.  If you would like to attend these classes please email Fr. James james.ross.mcd@gmail.com.

Sunday Morning Adult Education

The Power of Myth

This course will explore how the themes and symbols of ancient myths continue to bring meaning to birth, death, love, and war. From stories of the gods and goddesses of ancient Greece and Rome to traditions of Buddhism, Hinduism and Christianity, a broad array of themes are considered that together identify the universality of human experience across time and culture.

Joseph Campbell was a preeminent scholar, writer, and teacher and hMythad a profound influence on millions of people--including Star Wars creator George Lucas. To Campbell, mythology was the "song of the universe, the music of the spheres." With Bill Moyers, one of America’s most prominent journalists, as his thoughtful and engaging interviewer, The Power of Myth touches on subjects from modern marriage to virgin births, from Jesus to John Lennon, offering a brilliant combination of intelligence and wit.

Jan. 3 & 10  The First Storytellers: Discusses the importance of accepting death as rebirth as in the story of Christ or the myth of the buffalo, the rite of passage in primitive societies, the role of mystical Shamans, and the decline of ritual in today's society.

Jan. 17 & 24  Sacrifice and Bliss: Examines the role of sacrifice in myth, which symbolizes the necessity for rebirth. Stresses the need for everyone of us to find our sacred place in the midst of today's fast-paced, technological world.

Jan. 31 & Feb 7  Love and the Goddess: Campbell talks about romantic love, beginning with the 12th century troubadours, and addresses questions about the image of women -- as goddess, virgin, Mother Earth.

Classes are held on Sunday Mornings from 9-10 in the Conference Room.

Tuesday Seminars

life...The Meaning of Life: Perspectives from the World’s Great Intellectual Traditions

A Seminar of Theological Reflection on Philosophy & Religion in the West & East

January 5                   Daodejing - Subtlety and Paradox
January 12                 Zhuangzi on Daoism - Impermanence and Harmony
January 19                 The Teachings of the Buddha
January 26                 Santideva - Mahayana Buddhism

The seminar takes place on Tuesday Mornings  from 10:30 – noon in the Conference Room .

THANK YOU......
         THANK YOU.....
                   THANK YOU.....

...To June Russell and the Altar Guild and to brass polishers par excellence who polished all the brass in the church, and made Christmas beautiful;

....to all who took time on a busy Sunday to help 'green' the church;

...To Sue & Doug Lohnas and the Choir members, to Lisa McDonald and the Bell Choir and to the instrumental ensemble who helped to make Advent and Christmas beautiful;

...To the lectors, chalice bearers and acolytes who made our worship possible;

...To Lisa Zebrowski and all those who helped in the toddler and nursery rooms;

...To the ushers and to the offering counters;

...To Paul de Kanel who worked so hard to prepare bulletins and make other arrangements;

...To Donna & Joe White, our sextons who made the church shine;

....to all of you who do quiet things in quiet ways and help this parish to work.

When to Call Your Clergy

Many people have the idea that the only time they should call their priest or deacon is when someone is critically ill or when there is a death in the family, and some don't even do that.  Here are ten occasions when you should have no hesitation in picking up the phone to call James or Pat:

1.  Before going to the hospital. It makes no difference whether you are going to the hospital for major surgery or for a routine checkup - call before you go.

2.  When alcohol or drugs become a problem for you or for someone you love. The alcoholic or
drug-dependent person is not a hopeless sinner - he or she is a person with a disease who needs treatment.  There are no easy answers to chemical dependency, but the clergy can help you to understand these problems or to assist families and individuals in locating help.

3.  Before you engage a lawyer. This does not mean before you get an attorney for any purpose, but before engaging one when a husband and wife are considering separation.  If you take the Christian view of marriage seriously, you will wish to talk through your situation with clergy or other pastoral counselor before matters proceed to the point of seeking legal counsel.

4.  When a baby is born. When a new member of our family is born, James or Pat would like to call while the mother is still in the hospital.  This is a good opportunity to rejoice with the family and to ask God's blessing upon the child.

5.  When you would like to talk or pray about a difficult decision. The big decisions in life are so important that they should be "talked out and prayed through".  Your work, perhaps getting married, a change in jobs - are all included.

6.  When you know someone in need of spiritual help. It is part of our Christian responsibility to be alert to the needs of others.  If you know of someone who needs help, do not hesitate to call.  

7.  When there is a death in the family. No matter what the hour of day or night the clergy should be called at once. Their task is to bring you the strong consolation offered by our Christian faith and to counsel you concerning arrangements for the funeral.

8.  When you are spiritually depressed. Remember, help is available!  The finest Christians have all gone through their dark night of the soul.  Don't try to fight it through alone.  If God seems far off and religion has lost its reality, you are not the first person to feel that way.  Don't struggle with spiritual depression by yourself.

9.  Before anyone enters the armed forces or leaves for college.  Not only will the clergy want to know their address away from home, but would like to opportunity to make a personal visit to assure them of the concern of their home parish while they are away.

10. When you want to share a thanksgiving. When a parishioner wants to share a thanksgiving for all God's gracious gifts, the clergy will be delighted to share this with you.

Fr.  James - 522-3906
Deacon Pat
Parish office - 346-6241   

January, 2015

Not a final schedule. Tune in Sunday mornings for the latest information in the announcements and the bulletin.

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat


      1
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
2
9:00 Morning Prayer

3
7:30 Morning prayer 
8:00 Communion
9:30 Nursery Care 
9:00 Adult Education
9:30 Choir rehearsal
10:15 Communion

4
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Office


5
9:00 Morning Prayer 
10:30 Seminar
6
8:30 Osteo Exercise
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Communion & Healing
7:30 Bible Study
7:30 Bells
7
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Office


7:30 Choir
8
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
9
9:00 Morning Prayer
10 Epiphany
7:30 Morning prayer 
8:00 Communion
9:30 Nursery Care 
9:00 Adult Education
9:45 Choir rehearsal
10:15 Communion
11:30 The Kings & Epiphany Pot Luck
11
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
7:30 Vestry



12
9:00 Morning Prayer 
10:30 Seminar

7:30 Book Club

13
8:30 Osteo Exercise
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Communion & Healing

7:30 Bible Study
7:30 Bells
14
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Office


7:30 Choir
15
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
16
9:00 Morning Prayer

10:00 Clothing Swap
17
7:30 Morning prayer 
8:00 Communion
9:30 Nursery Care  
9:00 Adult Education
9:45 Choir rehearsal
10:15 Communion& Kids Class
18
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Parish Council
19
9:00 Morning Prayer 
10:30 Seminar

20
8:30 Osteo Exercise
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Communion & Healing
Noon: DOK

7:30 Bible Study
7:30 Bells

21
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Office


7:30 Choir
22
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
23
9:00 Morning Prayer
24
7:30 Morning prayer 
8:00 Communion
9:30 Nursery Care 
9:00 Adult Education
9:45 Choir rehearsal
10:15 Communion
11:30 Annual Meeting
25
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Office
26
9:00 Morning Prayer 
10:30 Seminar


7:00 ECW
27
8:30 Osteo Exercise
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Communion & Healing

7:30 Bible Study
7:30 Bells
28
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Office

7:30 Choir
29
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
30
9:00 Morning Prayer
31
7:30 Morning prayer 
8:00 Communion
9:30 Nursery Care 
9:00 Adult Education
9:45 Choir rehearsal
10:15 Communion
11:30 Kid's Class
           

St. Stephen's Episcopal Church

Church Staff
The Rev. Dr. James R. McDonald, Rector,
The Rev. Patricia L. Jones, Deacon,
Miranda Rand, Christian Education Director,
Susan Lohnas, Organist,
Douglas Lohnas, Choir Director,
Lisa Zebrowski, Nursery Manager,
Laura Bynon and Chris Quinn, Nursery School
Joe and Donna White, Custodians

The Vestry
Sr. Warden, Erin Cohen
Jr. Warden, Brian Riordon
Clerk, Tracy Ormsbee
Treasurer, Denise Crates

Class of 2015:
Jack Feyrer
Bill Frank
Jim Syta

Class of 2016:

Travis Reedy 

Class of 2017

Joanne Frank
Peter Nelson
Elissa Prout

The Church Office
Our office is located at 1229 Baker Avenue. 
The telephone number is (518) 346-6241.
If we are unable to answer your call, please leave a message.
We will call you back as soon as possible. 
The Rector's email is: james.ross.mcd@gmail.com
Our website is http://www.saintstephenschenectady.org/
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/SaintStephensSchenectady
The Messenger is published September - June. 
Please submit articles to editor Chris Jones by the 25th of the Month before.