October 2015

Contents

Guest Preachers
Fr. James

Tag Sale
Sustainable Development
Adult Education
Church School
New Members
First communion
All Saints Day
Home communion
Shop News
Parish Directory
Simon the Baleful
Carole
SICM
St. Francis Day
Calendar
Masthead

Guest Preachers in OctoberKent Bushman

This month we are pleased to welcome two guest preachers. 

On October 4th Kent Busman will preach at both Eucharists, including the time with children, and will speak at the adult education class at 9am.  He brings with him 29 years of experience at Camp Fowler as well as the learnings from raising his own three children along with his much smarter wife, Jill.

Kent will combine stories, Scripture, and musings as he shares how we might, as parents, grandparents, aunts, and uncles help raise a new generation who sees this world as a sacred trust filled with wonder and work; sorrow and joy. 

Kent is an ordained minister in the Reformed Church and serves as the Executive Director of Camp Fowler: a Christian camp grounded in openness and hospitality in the Southern Adirondacks. Could there be a more appropriate person to visit us on St. Francis’ Day?

CaryAnd then on October 18th Dr. Phillip Cary will preach at both Eucharists and will speak at the adult education class at 9am.  He is Professor of Philosophy at Eastern University in St. Davids, Pennsylvania, where he is also Scholar-in-Residence at the Templeton Honors College. As a scholar, Professor Cary's specialty is the thought of Augustine, but he has also published scholarly articles on Luther, the doctrine of the Trinity, and personal knowledge. He was the lecturer (via DVD) for St. Stephen’s course on Philosophy and Theology.

Dear Friends,James

There's something about money that really gets to people.  Why does the church talk so frequently about money?

The answer, I believe, is because Jesus frequently talked about money. Sixteen of his 38 parables were about money or possessions; one tenth of all gospel verses are about money or possessions.  There are 500 verses in Scripture that deal with prayer, and a few less that deal with faith, yet more than 1,000 verses deal with money and material goods.  Therefore, the article concludes, it is no wonder that the church, when it is faithful to the gospel, follows in that tradition and talks about money.

I believe that Jesus was right when he said: "Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also."

During the third week this month you will receive a summary of next year's budget.  The annual budget is no great mystery.  We spend much of our money each year on staff, on people who work with people.  This is not 'overhead'.  You cannot run a church with an office, a computer and a fax.  As our church grows, one of the most crucial things we can do is to provide people in education, music, pastoral care, administration, and worship leadership, to build, nurture and lead the church of Jesus Christ.

In addition, we spend money on space, the maintenance and upkeep of buildings to house the activities of the church.  We spend a relatively small amount on the tools of ministry:  scissors and paste, choir robes, and Church School material.  And we give some of our money away to ministries near and far so that we may join with others in support of such things as a Jail Ministry, the Schenectady Inner City Ministry, and the outreach of our denomination in every StepUppart of the world through a portion of the Diocesan Quota.

The vestry is very concerned about increased costs to the church in 2016 compared with loss of past pledges due to relocation or retirement.  We will need to increase pledges in the budget for next year.  That increase is also due to our congregation's growth, both in programs and people.  As we grow, we count on the stewardship of our new members as well as that of those who have undergirded the work of the church in the past, to help us be the church we need, want, and can be.

That's why the church talks about money.  That is why your church is asking you to increase your pledge of time, talent and treasure.  And God knows, it will mean sacrifice.  Some people give out of their abundance: they give stock, they take from their investments; and it has no effect whatsoever on how they live from day to day.  Jesus did not criticize that, for there are all sorts of ways to be a good steward.  But some have no abundance.  They give out of what they have to live on.  Their giving to the church and other organizations affects what they have to spend on food, clothes, housing, and travel.  They make a real sacrifice and they do it lovingly and thankfully.

Fr. James+

Tag Sale

The Tag Sale takes place Saturday October 3rd from 9 to 2 with traditional bag sale at 1pm.  Signup sheets for set-up and the sales force are in the nave extension.  Questions: contact Doreen May 505-1913 or RDMay95@earthlink.netPresale items will be available during setup times....see Doreen.

Call for baked goods!  The bake sale (part of the Tag Sale, Saturday October 3) will be a joint effort between the parish and the Girl Scouts.  We will need donations from anyone willing to bake!  Email Erin Cohen at cohenerine@gmail.com for details or questions.

Agenda for Sustainable Development

From the U.N. News Centre (on the day that Pope Francis addressed the General Assembly)

goals

25 September 2015  – The 193-Member United Nations General Assembly today formally adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, along with a set of bold new Global Goals, which Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon hailed as a universal, integrated and transformative vision for a better world.

“The new agenda is a promise by leaders to all people everywhere. It is an agenda for people, to end poverty in all its forms – an agenda for the planet, our common home,” declared Mr. Ban as he opened the UN Sustainable Development Summit which kicked off today and wraps up Sunday.

The UN chief’s address came ahead of the Assembly’s formal adoption of the new framework, Transforming Our World: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which is composed of 17 goals and 169 targets to wipe out poverty, fight inequality and tackle climate change over the next 15 years.

The Goals aim to build on the work of the historic Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which in September 2000, rallied the world around a common 15-year agenda to tackle the indigERDnity of poverty.

ERD

And from the President of Episcopal Relief & Development:

25 September 2015 – The MDGs are judged, on balance, to have achieved quite a bit.  Perhaps not as much as hoped, but more good happened as a result of them than would have been the case had they not provided a framework for setting goals and measuring progress. Importantly, the SDGs acknowledge that there is unfinished MDG business.

            As the world turns its attention to the SDGs, there are a number of things about which we, as Episcopalians, should be very pleased when we look at the Goals. 

  • First and foremost, is the objective to “End poverty in all its forms everywhere?”  The universality of this goal is something that Jesus surely would have embraced.
  • Second, and related to this objective, is a paradigm shift in how development is approached in the goals.  For a long time, “development” has been understood to be something that is done by wealthy people or countries to or for poor people or countries.  The SDGs call on all countries (including our own) to develop detailed plans to address poverty in our own local contexts.  Episcopal Relief & Development has long understood that sustainable development must start at the grassroots level and focus first and foremost on leveraging local assets.  That is not to say that external resources aren’t important or even vital, but those resources need to be paired with local leadership, ingenuity and commitment.
  • Third, the SDGs place a heavy emphasis on data collection and measuring outcomes.  To this, all I can say is: “Praise the LORD!”  All too often, organizations and individuals let themselves off the hook as long as intentions are good.  Unintended consequences are not acknowledged, and in some cases can be seriously disruptive.  This will be a heavy lift.  Data collection and measuring outcomes is not easy or uniform across the development community.  Episcopal Relief & Development has been a leader in this space particularly through our flagship malaria prevention program, NetsforLife®, so I feel we are well positioned to make a contribution to this challenge.
  • Fourth, gender equity is front and center in the goals.  Those working in the development sphere know from empirical evidence that full inclusion of women and girls is vital to the success of just about any development endeavor.  A disproportionate number of people living in poverty or without access to power and influence are women.  This will have to change.  Episcopal Relief & Development is working on this issue continuously.  Most recently, our focus on Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV) and engaging faith communities in this work is an excellent example of just one way we are addressing this challenge. 
  • Fifth, and finally, the goals acknowledge the impact of changing climates around the world, and the need to embrace strategies that promote development in ways that do not contribute to the problem.  Episcopal Relief & Development has long-embraced “climate smart agriculture” which seeks to enable our partners to sustain livelihoods in increasingly difficult circumstances without further damaging the environment.

It’s easy to be cynical when looking at the SDGs.  We’ve gone from eight MDGs to 17 SDGs with over 130 sub-goals.  How is it possible to make sense out of all that?

Well, it’s not easy.  But neither is ending global poverty.  It seems to me the important thing is to recognize that everyone has a role to play in this work.

The Episcopal Church can be justifiably proud of its support of the MDGs over the last several years.  We’re alone among faith groups in having fully endorsed the MDGs as a mission priority.  But we can’t rest on our laurels.
With the emphasis on universality in the SDGs, the United States needs to develop a strategy for ending poverty in this country.  That’s a huge undertaking.  The Episcopal Church along with local dioceses and congregations has an opportunity to speak out on how that should happen here.

However, “thinking globally and acting locally” doesn’t prevent us from taking action globally, too!  Episcopal Relief & Development stands ready to assist our global and international partners as they develop strategies to address the SDGs in their local contexts.  

Are you ready to play your part?

ERD is at https://www.episcopalrelief.org/

Adult Education

Wednesday Bible Study: Hebrew Scriptures Overviewbible

This course is a survey of the stories of the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament), while discussing some of the scholarly issues surrounding each part of the Old Testament (such as the JEDP theory). The videos take account of new research in the field of biblical studies.
These classes are presented as a survey, not a theology. So don't expect it to stand up for any particular theological perspective (you will be given the tools to do that on your own). It is a useful introductory-level course for students starting out in biblical study.

October 7 – From Abraham through Conquest of Canaan
October 14 - From David through The Exile
October 21 – From the Return from Exile through  Alexander & Hellenism
October 28 - From The Apocrypha through  Maccabees

Classes are held on Wednesday evenings from 7:30 to 9:00 in the Conference room.  If you would like to attend these classes please email Fr. James james.ross.mcd@gmail.com

.Sunday Morning Adult Education Classes

October 4 – The Rev. Kent Bushman presents
October 11 - Painting the Stars: Celebrating the communion of science and faith
October 18 – Dr. Phillip Cary presents
October 25 - Painting the Stars: Celebrating the communion of science and faith

Classes are held on Sunday Mornings from 9-10 in the Conference Room.

The Meaning of Life: Perspectives from the World’s Great Intellectual Traditions

lifeA Seminar of Theological Reflection on Philosophy & Religion in the West & East

What is the meaning of life? It's a question every thoughtful person has pondered at one time or another. Indeed, it may be the biggest question of all. Most of us have asked ourselves this question at some time, or posed it to somebody we respect.

This year-long course is an invigorating way to begin or to continue your pursuit of these questions, with no previous background in philosophical or religious thought required. This course offers a rigorous and wide-ranging exploration of what various spiritual, religious, and philosophical traditions from both the East and the West have contributed to this profound line of questioning.

The seminar takes place on Tuesday Mornings  from 10:30 – noon in the Conference Room .

Church School Miranda

Due to the later-than usual Labor Day holiday and subsequent late start of most school districts, with September already rolling into October we are only just getting started. 

Some changes this year:

Students Pre-K through 1st Grade will meet with Nursery Manager Lisa Zebrowski in the nursery, where they will receive simple instruction; a short bible story and a craft or coloring activity. When Lisa has a large number of very small children in addition to her class then those eligible children may be absorbed into the next level. At the parent’s discretion, they may stay in the nursery for the duration of the 10:15 service or they may start with their parents in the church and come out after the children’s message.

Students Grades 2-5 are working on selecting a name for their class – we are meeting in the library to have a more grown-up experience, sitting around a table instead of on the floor. The classroom that was used for Godly Play in previous years will keep the Godly Play story sets and be used as the Christian Education office with art supplies and curriculum stored there. This class is using more sophisticated and interactive teaching materials – an ability to read is a benefit but not a requirement.  This group comes out of church after the children’s message and returns when the ushers let us know that communion is about to start.

Students Grades 6-8 meet in the Sunday Friends room after the 10:15 service for bible study and discussion. One Sunday a month they will work on a service project with Molly Ormsbee and George Woodzell. This group meets after the 10:15 service for 40 minutes.

Service Project: Sunday Friends first service project will be to host the coffee hour after the 10:15 service on October 4. Guest speaker Kent Busman, who has visited our classrooms in the past, will be preaching at 8:00am and 10:15, leading a seminar between the two services and bringing a message about Camp Fowler, the summer camp and year-round conference center that he manages in Speculator during the coffee hour.

Acolytes: Acolytes are trained by Allison deKanel to serve on the altar during services. Currently Ganon and Brody Riordon serve on the first Sunday of the month at the 10:15 service.  Joseph Santiago will soon start training to serve at the 8:00am service.

Sunday Morning Office Hours: I will be in the classroom between the nursery and the conference room every Sunday that church school is in session between 9:30 and 10:15 – any parent or member of the congregation who would like to discuss any aspect of the program is most welcome to stop in at that time.  If that time does not work, then please call me and I will be happy to set an appointment to come to your house or to meet you at the church. 

Miranda Rand, Christian Education Director

New Members’ Classes

Want to Become a Member?  On Sunday, October 4th the rector will begin a series of four Inquirers’ classes.  Participants would not be making a commitment of any sort by attending the classes.  They are intended to give you an overview of how Episcopalians fit into the complex of protestant and catholic churches.  He will be talking about the National Episcopal Church, our own Diocese of Albany, our own parish of St. Stephen’s and the relationship among all three. 

Fr. James takes the decision to join a church very seriously.  Therefore it is incumbent upon him to let you know the truth: both what he thinks are wonderful things about our church, and also some not-so-wonderful things.  There is always candid and open discussion.

The classes will be held in an informal atmosphere.  It is required for all adults who wish to be confirmed or received into the church, but is open to all members of the Parish Family.  Bishop Love will be here to confirm new members on November 8th and so this is a timely class to take. 

We will meet on Sunday afternoons between Noon and 1:00 p.m. from October 4th through October 25th.  Participants will meet in the parish office, the aluminum sided house on Baker Avenue.  There is limited parking in the office driveway.

Most people who attended the classes have enjoyed them, even if they did not decide to take the important step into formal membership into the congregation.

communion classCommunion Classes

The prayerbook stresses that baptism is the beginning of full membership in the Church.  Since all baptized Christians are welcome at the altar, discretion is left to parents as to when they want their child to begin receiving communion.  Criteria for Confirmation involve the moment when a person is both old enough and prepared enough to know the implications of making a voluntary, public and personal acceptance of the vows made earlier at Baptism on his/her behalf.

Classes for parents and children who are planning to prepare for reception to the Holy Communion, and those who have already begun receiving but who want further preparation, will meet on two Wednesdays: October 21st in the parish hall from 4:45 pm to 6:15 pm and October 28th in the church from 4:45 pm to 5:30 pm.   Parents are needed to help on October 21st.

Those parents wishing their children to take communion for the first time could plan to do so on All Saints Sunday, November 1th at the 10:15 am Eucharist.

All Saints' Day

All Saint's Day is one of the seven principal feasts of the church.  This day is a celebration of Christ in His whole mystical body.  We are reminded that the saints still support us by their witness and example and surround us with their love and prayers.  All Saint's Day is the one day set aside each year when our faithful departed are remembered.  If you would like to have a particular person remembered by name, it is not too late. Please call the parish office as soon as you receive this newsletter.  We will remember them on Sunday, November 1st at the 8 & 10:15 Eucharists.  The later service will include first communion for some of our young people.

Home Communion

If you or someone you know is unable to attend church on either a long or short-term basis, please call the parish office if you would like to have communion brought to you.

St. Stephens Shop Newsshop

October is Sale month at the Shop.  We need to free up space for the arriving Holiday merchandise, so please stop by.  We have some fantastic bargains waiting for your purchase.  Thanks, Blessings too, Louise, Claudia, June and Marilyn.

More Shop News--The Shop needs a new manager.  It has been a fun experience for me but the time has come for me to retire.  Please contact me; it’s not a hard job and is really very rewarding to have all of you give the Shop so much support. My helpers, Louise, Claudia and June have been super to work with and have staffed the shop when I have been away.  I appreciate that so much, thanks to them and all of you for shopping at the Shop.  Over the years we have given donations for Scholarships to Work camp with our profits, again thanks to all of you.  Please contact me soon, I know you will enjoy being part of The Shop at St. Stephen's.  Marilyn  phones;  393 7516  or 396 0792

The Parish Directorydirectory

It is our practice to print a Parish Directory each year. We have new members from time to time, people move, change their email addresses, have kids, get married, and so forth. We have been including pictures in recent years. During the month of October, we would like to update the pictures and information, so that the new directory can be as up-to-date as possible.

This is not a membership listing. Membership is about baptism, confirmation, letters of transfer, voting at the annual meeting, and so forth. Questions about membership should be addressed to Father James. He's holding a "new members" class to explore membership, among other things.

We include pictures. If you have a favorite picture which you would like to use in the directory, that would be fine. If you would like me to take a snapshot of your family, I would be glad to do that; just see me after church sometime. I usually carry a camera.

We also have an on-line directory. If you are unable to access it, please let me know. Chris Jones, for the Communication Committee.

Simon the Baleful Simon

Have you seen Simon? His full name is Simon the Baleful (which means “sinister”) and he is currently residing on the shelf of “The Shop.” Simon is a gargoyle, a creature most often found on medieval churches. You will notice that he has a rather large mouth: that is because the purpose of a gargoyle is to sit on a top corner of the church and spit out the rainwater that would otherwise run down and damage the walls and foundations. Gargoyles are deliberately made to look ugly, because their secondary job, after spitting, is to frighten away any evil spirits lurking about.

I first met Simon, or at least the instructions for making him, in the little shop at Wells Cathedral in England. Somehow, he seemed to be just the right souvenir to bring home with me from my trip. Most gargoyles are made of stone or concrete, and some are painted various colors, so I chose to make him in my favorite color. Please stop by The Shop and introduce yourself to Simon--he is really rather charming, I think, and so far he has not spat on anyone.

Deacon Pat

Caregivers Support

On October 21 from 1-2 at st. Stephens there will be a caregiver support group to assist caregivers with information . Any questions contact Vicki Hoshko at 382-8481 ext 1008

PARISH PROFILE: Carole Merrill-Mazurek

(Parish Profiles is a monthly article about members of our congregation edited by Miranda Rand)

Please tell us a little about yourself:Where did you grow up? Do you have siblings? How did you meet Budd? How many children/grandchildren do you have?

I grew up in Binghamton, NY. I have one brother, John, who still resides in Binghamton; he is a burly, bright and loving man who is a joy to have as a sibling. Budd and I met through a mutual acquaintance; we have been married for close to 27 yearCarol and Budds. His presence in my life is a true blessing. We have a blended family of five children and nine grandchildren and they all are as different as they can be. We see them frequently and enjoy “Nonni and Pa” time with them. Our oldest grandson, a sharp observer of adults, has classified us as “Pa being the fun one and Nonni the rule enforcer” (go figure)! As with any family we have had our share of struggles, deaths, illnesses and disappointments, as well as the gifts of love, joy, hope, and family bonds. Budd and I take nothing for granted so our mantra is: “for today everything fine” or as “Pete the Cat” says “It’s all good” (at least for today).

You worked for a long time at the Schenectady YWCA and won recognition for your work with homeless and battered women. Were you always passionate about working with women?

I grew up in a very blue collar family, with a dad who worked two jobs to support our family. My parents also cared for the less fortunate in our community, giving the little extra money they had to make life better for someone else. I learned from them the importance of giving without judging. I knew after completing college that working within a system that supported women was where I needed to be. I started volunteering in women’s organizations, first a sheltered workshop for the disabled and eventually volunteering and working for women’s services at the YWCA Northeastern NY.

What were the greatest unmet needs among women when you started at the YW and how did that change as you grew into your job?

Initially our team concentrated on the infra-structure of the shelter operations and worked diligently to train police officers on appropriate intervention in a domestic violence occurrence. Frequently an officer would simply ask the perpetrator to “take a walk around the block”: you can imagine what happened when the perpetrator returned. During my tenure our team started intensifying trainings for law enforcement in Schenectady County. We worked closely with the area police departments to create and implement pro-arrest policies. These policies allowed police departments to make an arrest because of the preponderance of evidence at the crime scene, rather than the statement of the victim -- victims are frequently terrified of retaliation if they give a statement. The YW team also started educating the community on the dynamics of domestic violence and services. We worked closely with the district attorney’s office on prosecutions and supported victims through the Grand Jury process. Toward the end of my tenure we established the Schenectady County Domestic Violence Task Force, made up of professionals from law enforcement, the judiciary, hospitals, social service and community members, whose goal was to coordinate services to keep victims safe and hold perpetrators accountable.

Since you retired you have started doing volunteer work in the community – where do you volunteer and what do you do? What brings you joy, and what frustrates you in this work?

I serve on the Board of Directors of three organizations: Bethesda House – an organization that offers sanctuary for the most vulnerable of the homeless; Healing a Woman’s Soul – an organization that offers spiritual support in the Christian tradition to domestic violence victims; and Fostering Futures, NY, an organization that supports foster families in caring for abused and neglected children. I volunteer weekly at the SICM Food Pantry and bi-monthly at the Bethesda House Food Pantry.  I run a quarterly program “Senior Connect” which offers additional support to mature adults. I enjoy working on the various boards, it gives me an opportunity to support an organization administratively and be part of a conversation concerning systemic changes to enhance services to the disenfranchised. Working in the food pantries is absolutely inspiring. I have the opportunity to interact in a very personal way with beautiful souls who are kind, loving and God-centered, who exhibit joy and love while dealing with devastating circumstances. I always feel that I am on Holy Ground when I am at the pantries. I am always frustrated when I hear judgments concerning the poor, especially from individuals who purport to be religious, frequently forgetting the lessons Jesus taught.

You have been a member of St. Stephen’s for a long time, and you are very active in the congregation-- what attracted you to the congregation? Which volunteer job is your favorite?

We have been members of St. Stephen’s for eighteen years. Budd and I were attracted to the social justice issues that the church had given priority and the warmth and friendliness exhibited by church members. I love all the activities I am involved in – it gives me an opportunity to be fully involved in the amazing family that calls our parish home.

When you are not volunteering your time in a local non-profit or at St. Stephen’s, what is your recreation? What do you do to relax?

I enjoy spending time with our family. Budd and I have done more traveling since his retirement. I love to read, I paint, I am an avid walker (our dog, Katie, is my walking companion), and I look for new adventures.

SICM News

What’s happening? 

October Assembly on the 6th at Mt. Olivet Missionary Baptist Church – Refreshments at 6:45 and the meeting begins at 7 with Supt. Larry Spring.  He’ll be providing the latest about the city schools, and will answer questions.  Use the SICM office entrance at 1055 Wendell Ave.

Open House/Tour on October 13.  Tour begins at 8:30 at the Wendell Ave. office with refreshments, then moves to the Emergency Food Pantry on Albany St.; St. Joseph’s Place next to the pantry; Schenectady Damien Center 615 Nott Street and ends back at the office.  Please RSVP to SICM Office, 374-2683 by October 9.

Harvest For the Pantry on Sunday November 8 from 4:00 to 7:00pm at First Reformed Church, 224 North Ballston Avenue, Scotia.  Dinner and the Silent Auction!  Tickets are available at the SICM office or in church after the October Assembly.  Tickets are $30.00 ($25. of this is eligible for a GE match.)

Amy, Eunice and Marti

See the SICM website for more details.

Blessing of the Animals and St. Francis of Assisi

On OctobeSt Francis Dayr 4th we celebrate the life and work of St. Francis.  He is probably better known for preaching to birds than for the poverty he embraced in his passion to be like Christ.  Yet, Francis' love of God's creation has given his statue a place in many church and home gardens.

No mere nature lover, Francis saw in nature's paradoxes and mysteries a revelation of the presence of God.  He marveled at the simplicity and obedience of the birds, fishes, rabbits, doves, the falcon who wakened him for Matins, the famous wolf of Gubbio who gave his pledge of peace to Francis and kept it.

Because of St. Francis' connection to God's creation, and especially to animals, a tradition arose in England whereby the parish priest would bless the villagers' animals on St. Francis' Day.  For many years St. Stephen's has continued this tradition.  Here's how it will work:

On Saturday, October 3rd  the congregation and any animals (on leashes!) will gather on the parish front lawn. WE WILL REMAIN OUTSIDE DURING THE ENTIRE SERVICE.  The rector will begin a brief worship service and then will bless each animal saying:  "O God, who has made all things for yourself, bless, we pray you, this animal; that it may be a source of love and joy to those with whom it dwells."

It’s quite a sight!

The Calendar - October, 2015

DRAFT copy - Check the Sunday morning announcements, the sunday bulletin, or the website calendar for the latest information.

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat





1
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Office



7:30 Choir
2
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
3
9:00 Morning Prayer
9:00: Tag Sale
10:00 Blessing of the Animals

7:30 Labyrinth
4: Kent Busman
7:30 Morning prayer 
8:00 Communion
9:00 Nursery Care 
9:00 Adult Education
10:15 Communion & Kids Class
11:30 Kid's Class

1:00 New Member's Class
5
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Office
6
9:00 Morning Prayer 
10:30 Seminar



6:00 Girl Scouts

7
8:30 Osteo Exercise
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Communion & Healing


7:30 Bible Study
7:30 Bells
8
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Office



7:30 Choir
9
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
10
9:00 Morning Prayer
11
7:30 Morning prayer 
8:00 Communion
9:00 Nursery Care 
9:00 Adult Education
10:15 Communion & Kids Class
11:30 Kid's Class

1:00 New Member's Class
12
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Office 


13
9:00 Morning Prayer 
10:30 Seminar



7:00 Book Club
14
8:30 Osteo Exercise
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Communion & Healing


7:30 Bible Study
7:30 Bells
15
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Office



7:30 Choir
16
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
17
9:00 Morning Prayer
18: Dr. Phillip Cary
7:30 Morning prayer 
8:00 Communion
9:00 Nursery Care 
9:00 Adult Education
10:15 Communion & Kids Class
11:30 Kid's Class

1:00 New Member's Class
19
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Parish Council





7:30 Vestry
20
9:00 Morning Prayer 
10:30 Seminar

21
8:30 Osteo Exercise
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Communion & Healing
10:30 DOK

1:00 Caregivers Support Group
4:45 Communion Class
7:30 Bible Study
7:30 Bells

22
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Office






7:30 Choir
23
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
24
9:00 Morning Prayer
25
7:30 Morning prayer 
8:00 Communion
9:00 Nursery Care 
9:00 Adult Education
10:15 Communion & Kids Class
11:30 Kid's Class

1:00 New Member's Class
26
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Office



7:30Communications Committee
27
9:00 Morning Prayer 
10:30 Seminar



7:30 ECW
28
8:30 Osteo Exercise
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Communion & Healing


4:45 Communion Class
7:30 Bible Study
7:30 Bells
29
9:00 Morning Prayer
10:00 Office




7:30 Choir
30
8:30 Osteo Exercise 
9:00 Morning Prayer
31
9:00 Morning Prayer

St. Stephen's Episcopal Church

Church Staff
The Rev. Dr. James R. McDonald, Rector,
The Rev. Patricia L. Jones, Deacon,
Miranda Rand, Christian Education Director,
Susan Lohnas, Organist,
Douglas Lohnas, Choir Director,
Lisa Zebrowski, Nursery Manager,
Laura Bynon and Chris Quinn, Nursery School
Joe and Donna White, Custodians

The Vestry
Sr. Warden, Erin Cohen
Jr. Warden, Brian Riordon
Clerk, Tracy Ormsbee
Treasurer, Denise Crates

Class of 2015:
Jack Feyrer
Bill Frank
Jim Syta

Class of 2016:

Travis Reedy 

Class of 2017

Josanne Frank
Peter Nelson

The Church Office
Our office is located at 1229 Baker Avenue. 
The telephone number is (518) 346-6241.
If we are unable to answer your call, please leave a message.
We will call you back as soon as possible. 
The Rector's email is: james.ross.mcd@gmail.com
Our website is http://www.saintstephenschenectady.org/
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/SaintStephensSchenectady
The Messenger is published September - June. 
Please submit articles to editor Chris Jones by the 25th of the Month before.